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41457
New_user 41457 is new to Chictopia!

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41457

I am going to Tokyo and Nagasaki, any suggestions on where I should go or what to wear!?

posted over 9 years ago
MurasakiNeko
Style_council
MurasakiNeko

I’ve never been to Nagasaki, but I would imagine the Peace Park would be a must-see. (A downer one, but still). I’ve been to the one in Hiroshima and I felt it was extremely worthwhile.

Tokyo . . . holy crap. I’ve been there four times and I still haven’t done everything there is to do, so start with what interests you. The general “hip” areas are in Shibuya and the “jukus”— Shinjuku, Harajuku. Fashionwise, definitely check out Harajuku; there’s both high-end shopping and Takeshita street, where some trends are born— and some just stay there, lol. Ginza reputably is good for shopping as well, but it’s expensive. If you’re into anime, manga, or electronics, you’ll like Akihabara— just watch out for porn. Roppongi is reputably a little dangerous (but we’re talking “dangerous” for Japan, which is probably safer than normal for the rest of the world), but there is a lot of “foreigner” nightlife and I think the view from Tokyo Tower is worth a visit. For history and tradition, visit the imperial palace and the temples of Asakusa. And if you want to get up early and see something crazy, try the Tsukiji Fish Market. Look around online and try to get an idea of the flavor of the neighborhoods— or get a guidebook. The maps (especially of the subway!) will come in handy.

Both places, go crazy on the food. My advice: Try it, and THEN ask what it is; you may be surprised at what you like. (If I’d known what it was, I probably would never have realized how much I adore eel!— and I promise, most of it really isn’t that weird). And it may be cherry blossom season when you get there, which means parks will be crowded but everything will be very beautiful.

The weather will still be chilly in three weeks from now, so you’ll want to bring a jacket and layer during the day, especially since you’ll likely be walking outdoors a lot and you can’t depend on places like temples (or people’s houses! grr) to have central heat. (Also, prepare for the amazing squat toilet).

As far as style, as someone who travels a lot I really recommend comfort and anonymity over everything else. (But you can still be plenty chic that way _). You will see some crazy trends in Tokyo, but I don’t advise you necessarily show up wearing them. (Feel free to pick up ideas, though!). I recommend comfortable, broken-in shoes (I love black flats— go with everything, still chic, and fine for walking). Wear socks (or those little footie things) with your shoes— or carry them with you to put on wherever you go— because you will have to take your shoes off all over the place. Make sure your socks don’t have holes. The code of modesty for young people is generally pretty much the same as in the West, with one major difference: In Japan, people are totally unfazed by showing practically the tops of one’s thighs (the short-shorts with thigh-highs look was born here), but showing cleavage or baring one’s shoulders is seen as way sluttier. As a tourist, I’d stick to keeping all those areas mostly covered-up.

posted over 9 years ago
 
honeybird
Style_council
honeybird

I went to Japan the summer before last, and I LOVED it. You should definitely visit the peace park and the Hiroshima museum—it’s sad but beautiful. Other must sees are the hot springs (anywhere more rural, really, they’re everywhere), Kyoto, some of the historic villages (I had the chance to stay in a hut in Gokayama because I was on a world peace trip as a student ambassador), Tokyo MOST DEFINITELY—you should visit Akihabara to see all the crazy tech stuff, and Harajuku for the street fashion. As far as clothes go, the above user was correct to say that comfortable shoes are a MUST. However, the modern Japanese are really far less concerned with modesty than one would think. Their fashion is extremely varied. Just wear what you normally would, but be aware of the weather—they have a climate similar to that of the east coast, with very pronounced seasons, so be aware of what season you’re going to be visiting in! And definitely visit the temples; it’s interesting, and you can usually get some fascinating info from the monks.

Have fun! <3

posted over 9 years ago
 
franloiacono
Style_council
franloiacono

Wow…lucky you!
I’ve been in Tokyo twice and just looking forward to a third!!
I think Chictopians before me told more than I could lol

Harajuku is great and I think it deserves more than a visit!! Be sure to try even the little streets in Takeshita Dori ;)
Beside that I’d personally suggest HANJIRO, it’s a japanese brand that has lot of shops in Tokyo, I dunno if it may fits your style (and beside this, I took a look more to the male clothes lol)….but I find it great, very nice choice, they have their own line but they offer vintage too…and the prices are pretty cheap for me…
Here’s the site: http://www.hanjiro.co.jp/

posted over 9 years ago
 
killbella
Style_council
killbella

lucky that is the place i want to visit most in the world. go to SHABUYA 109 it is a huuuuge mall and it has tons of great stuff. it is one of the biggest shopping places in the world.

posted over 9 years ago
 
41457
New_user 41457 is new to Chictopia!

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41457

Wow thanks a lot for all the responses! I am so excited to go! I am going to be going with my friends family so we will be doing a lot of sight seeing and museum stuff. I hope i can sneak away to shop.

I am a little worried about shopping. I don’t know the sizes there but i am 5 foot 10 inches and size 8 1/2 shoe.

I was also wondering how much money I should bring for food, transportation, and shopping.

Also what souvenirs I should bring back for people.

posted over 9 years ago
 
franloiacono
Style_council
franloiacono

Food is very cheap if you try little restaurants ;) And so nice :D
For souvenirs you may find a lots in Asakusa (that deserves a visit ;))!
Museum stuff is good too ;D
Remember that the best day for Harajuku should be Sunday! ;)

posted over 9 years ago
 
MurasakiNeko
Style_council
MurasakiNeko

Unfortunately, you may have trouble shoe-shopping. I’m a US 7 or 7.5, and I’m a shoe size L here. You occasionally will run into LLs, but those are hard to find and might not fit you even then /-:

As for other clothes, a good bet is to go a size up from what you would usually buy— but definitely try on everything, because sometimes the cut and fit of things is a little weird. (Japanese tshirts are cut differently than American, for instance— they’re shorter and boxier— and the camisoles for some reason only ever come to my navel!). I’m 5’7’’ and I’m an M for most things, so I think at 5’10" you should still be able to find things that fit you.

Souvenirs are easy. There are Japanese tourist goody shops everywhere, selling dolls, fans, lanterns, embroidered purses, tshirts, incense, tea sets, pottery, traditional Japanese sweets, handkerchiefs, scrolls— all the stuff people expect. Some other fun things I have sent home as gifts are “Engrish” tshirts; go into any trendy store and look for the weirdest, most misspelled, hilarious expressions you can find. (Some of my favorites: “Paunchy Bombshell” “I Got Jiggy With It” and one with a long totally grammatically-incorrect poem about cats and lucky rolling stars). I have also gotten close friends yukata, a cotton robe (like a kimono, only less fancy and involved) worn for summer festivals that often come in bright prints. They’re usually somewhere between Y2000-5000, or $20-50. Sometimes the sash is sold separately.

As for money, it depends on how long you are there, what you will be doing, what kind of restaurants and entertainment you will be frequenting, how much you plan to shop and spend while shopping, how often/by what means you travel, and your accommodations and whether you are paying for them yourself. I tend to be a pretty thrifty traveler; I did a week in Tokyo and Kyoto including hotel and Shinkansen tickets for under $1000 (Shinkansen was most of that!), but so much depends on your traveling lifestyle, the amount of souvenirs you get, etc. And if you aren’t having to pay for certain things like hotel that cuts down a lot!

Harajuku Sundays are a double-edged sword. It’s also when everyone else comes out, so it is a sight to behold— but you will never, ever in a million years be able to get into some of the stores. My advice is, if you can, go once for the sights and again for the shopping! :-P

(By the way, while I’m nowhere close to Tokyo or Nagasaki, I do presently live in Japan, so if you have any further specific questions about travel, costs, resources about finding these things out, etc feel free to message me and I can try to help you out with what I can!).

posted over 9 years ago
 
41457
New_user 41457 is new to Chictopia!

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41457

I have more questions! I hope this isn’t too much.

I am attending a grad school graduation while I am there and don’t know what to wear. Are the graduations similar to one in the United State?

People keep telling me about shoes and bringing socks. Are wearing flats ok? Can I carry around a pair of socks in case i need to change out of them? Are boots that are easy to put on/take off ok? Can I wear tights with no socks?

So I am officially going to Kyoto for 2 nights also, and Kamakura for 1 night. Any advice on what to do there?

posted over 9 years ago
 
MurasakiNeko
Style_council
MurasakiNeko

Shoes and socks— You can wear whatever shoes you like! I just recommend something easy to slip on and off for when you visit temples (or schools, or even some restaurants), because you HAVE to take them off. As for socks, while you can be barefoot once you’ve taken your shoes off (nothing culturally wrong with it), for sanitary reasons I usually recommend wearing tights or socks, or carrying socks or little footies with you in your purse instead. Tights without socks are fine.

I lived in Kyoto for 4 months, and I have to say 2 nights is not nearly enough to see it all; it’s pretty much Famous Places In Japan Central. Some sites I would recommend are Kinkakuji (golden temple), Kiyomizudera (temple with three holy waterfalls and a great view of Kyoto and the mountains), Ryouanji (famous Zen rock garden), and Nijo Castle (built by a paranoid shogun— the floors squeak to warn of intruders!). Any travel site on Kyoto will list a crazy ton of historical sites and I think all are worth a visit, but I think these four will be most recognizable to you and others you show your pictures to if you can only be there for two days.

Shopping-wise for Kyoto, check out the Shijo/Sanjo area (those are the street names and bus stops), a shopping arcade with a crazy variety of shops, from trendy clothes and shoes to discount and thrift to kimono to traditional Japanese wares to souvenirs. It’s seriously one of my favorite places to shop in Japan, because you can find pretty much everything

posted over 9 years ago
 
41457
New_user 41457 is new to Chictopia!

Make Her Feel Welcome with Chic Points
10 points - Become a fan
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When 41457 reaches 200 Chic Points, she will be in the Style Council!
41457

My hotels, and train tickets are already paid for. I was thinking of bringing about $500 dollars (in cash) for local transportation, food, and souvenirs.

Should I bring more? or bring 500 and if i run out use an atm to get more money.

posted over 9 years ago
 
41457
New_user 41457 is new to Chictopia!

Make Her Feel Welcome with Chic Points
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When 41457 reaches 200 Chic Points, she will be in the Style Council!
41457

Oh also, I am since I will being seeing my friends brother should i bring a gift? I know you are supposed to bring gifts when meeting someone in their home. We are all American, and neither I or my friends family are of Asian/japanese decent. Should I still give him a gift?

posted over 9 years ago
 
the_ed
Style_council
the_ed

I don’t know about how efficient ATMs are in japan…but if you bring more cash, you shouldn’t carry all around at once. (That’s a general travel rule. It also helps to budget your spending.) Gifts are a tricky business in Japan. if you give someone gift, He may give you one back, which means you’re obligated to give him a gift, etc. (<-this>

posted over 9 years ago
 
MurasakiNeko
Style_council
MurasakiNeko

I’m not sure what your spending habits are as far as shopping, etc, but my general recommendation is to bring more than you think you might need and then just not use it if you don’t need it. Definitely take the_ed’s advice of carrying smaller amounts at a time, though. Japan is very safe, but better too safe than sorry.

You can certainly use ATMs in Japan, but they can be kind of weird. In bigger cities, especially in areas where tourists are common, there is usually an English setting for the ATM (which can be found in banks AND some convenience stores) but many of them are solely in Japanese— and some only service Japanese bank accounts. I would keep ATMs in mind for emergencies, but not rely on them.

If your friend’s brother is not Japanese, there is no cultural obligation to bring a gift. (As an American in Japan, I certainly don’t expect my guests from the States to bring me presents!). However, if you just want to bring one as a friendly gesture, there’s nothing wrong with that, either. It need not be extravagant or anything; since you are all American, stick to what feels right to you in an American context.

posted over 9 years ago
 
angiekje
Style_council
angiekje

so jealous, can I come?

posted almost 9 years ago
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